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UPM Raflatac Introduces RH09 Hotmelt Adhesive

Published on 2011-12-13. Author : SpecialChem

UPM Raflatac announces the release of its new and improved RH09 hotmelt adhesive for the Americas market, which is designed to meet the rigors of food package labeling. Labelstock converters and end-users leverage RH09 products for industry applications ranging from branding water bottles to marking fresh food packaging and providing point-of-sale information for deli and bakery items. These products, featuring a newly reformulated adhesive, also offer improved convertibility and die-cutting, accelerating press speeds while protecting machinery from adhesive buildup.

RH09 provides the initial tack and permanent adhesion required for non-polar refrigerated surfaces such as low surface energy plastics and corrugated boxes. This hotmelt adhesive is optimized for temperatures ranging from -40° to 122° Fahrenheit, even maintaining exceptional adhesion in the presence of moisture. Cost-effective and versatile, RH09 is paired with a broad range of UPM Raflatac's paper and film faces and liners, offering customers multiple options for their food package labeling needs.

"UPM Raflatac's RH09 adhesive reflects advancements in hotmelt adhesive formulation for the food and beverage industry," says Patrick Goss, Prime Business Director, Americas, UPM Raflatac. "Our RH09 adhesive product offering provides industry packagers, brand owners and merchants with an unbeatable combination of performance, versatility and value."

About UPM Raflatac

UPM Raflatac's labelstock products are designed to meet the needs of demanding applications in a vast array of end-uses. These include everything from personal and home care to applications in the food and pharmaceutical industries. Each product is designed to offer excellent printability, convertibility and durability in the latest labeling machinery.

Source: UPM Raflatac


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